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Excerpted from
Hey! Listen to This
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Although this Web site does not have the space to include all of the Introduction and biographical portrait of L. Frank Baum found in the print edition of Hey! Listen to This,
below is a condensation of the Introduction:

INTRODUCTION:
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L. Frank Baum (pronounced BOMB) had failed at almost everything he tried. But because of a nightly bedtime ritual—coupled with either a stroke of genius or a stroke of luck, he became the creator of America's first original fairy tale and its first science fiction writer.
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   Near the end of the last century, Baum and his wife were raising four boys and, as often happens with writers, his daily storytelling sessions began to reach into the soul of his talent. One night he was sitting in the hall, telling his sons a story, "and suddenly this one moved right in and took possession," he recalled later. "I shooed the children away and grabbed a piece of paper that was lying there on the rack and began to write. It really seemed to write itself. Then I couldn't find any regular paper, so I took anything at all, even a bunch of old envelopes."
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   At one point in the writing, he had the first part of the book's title but couldn't think of the rest. He had the word "Wizard" but wizard of what? At that point he glanced at his three-drawer file cabinet. The top drawer was labeled A-G; the middle was H-N; and the bottom was O-Z. And thus was born the name for "Oz."
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   What L. Frank Baum eventually wrote was something so altogether different, it became the first of its kind. He created a magic land, surrounded by deserts, and filled with wizards, witches, strange creatures, and incredible inventions. It was The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
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   From the very first day, the children loved it! It was the bestselling children book of the year. In fact, the children and parents immediately wanted more and demanded a sequel. Frank, on the other hand, wanted to go on to other stories. Finally, when his other books didn't sell, and after 10,000 pleading letters from children, he wrote a sequel. And then another. All told, he wrote 14 books about the magical kingdom, each one devoured by his loyal readers.
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   Eventually he moved to Hollywood and tried to make silent movies about Oz but they all flopped. He died at age 62, the author of more than 50 books and dozens of plays, but only the 14 Oz books were successful.
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    He was America's first science fiction writer. Indeed, as often happens in sci-fi, some of his imagining eventually became reality. Fourteen years after Baum wrote about a mechanical man, the word "robot" was coined—but Baum imagined him first. Fifty years before Walt Disney created a real magic kingdom, Baum imagined one. And almost a half-century before Dr. Seuss gave us fluff-muffled Truffles, Poozers, Skrinks, and one-wheeler Wubbles, Baum created Wheelers, Scoodlers, Munchkins, Skeezers, and Quadlings. (On the World Wide Web, see also The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Web Site (www.eskimo.com/~tiktok/index.html.

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   Frank Baum was a dreamer but not even he could have dreamed how big a success was waiting for that book back in 1899 when he was writing it. Today, because of the various movie or video versions of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, it is hard to find a five-year-old who is not familiar with it. Too often this keeps parents and teachers from reading aloud other Oz books and that's a shame because the third book in the series is often regarded as one of the best—Ozma of Oz. Here is the opening chapter from that book, accompanied by some of John R. Neil's art from the original editions, now reproduced in Morrow's "Books of Wonder" series.

—

 


CHAPTER 1:
The Girl in the Chicken Coop

The wind blew hard and joggled the water of the ocean, sending ripples across its surface. Then the wind pushed the edges of the ripples until they became waves, and shoved the waves around until they became billows.

   The billows rolled dreadfully high: higher even than the tops of houses. Some of them, indeed, rolled as high as the tops of tall trees, and seemed like mountains; and the gulfs between the great billows were like deep valleys. All this mad dashing and splashing of the waters of the big ocean, which the mischievous wind caused without any good reason whatever, resulted in a terrible storm, and a storm on the ocean is liable to cut many queer pranks and do a lot of damage.
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   At the time the wind began to blow, a ship was sailing far out upon the waters. When the waves began to tumble and toss and to grow bigger and bigger the ship rolled up and down, and tipped sidewise—first one way and then the other—and was jostled around so roughly that even the sailor-men had to hold fast to the ropes and railings to keep themselves from being swept away by the wind or pitched headlong into the sea.
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   And the clouds were so thick in the sky that the sunlight couldn't get through them; so that the day drew dark as night, which added to the terrors of the storm.
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he Captain of the ship was not afraid, because he had seen storms before, and had sailed his ship through them in safety; but he knew that his passengers would be in danger if they tried to stay on deck, so he put them all into the cabin and told them to stay there until after the storm was over, and to keep brave hearts and not be scared, and all would be well with them.
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   Now, among these passengers was a little Kansas girl named Dorothy Gale,who was going with her Uncle Henry to Australia, to visit some relatives they had never before seen. Uncle Henry, you must know, was not very well, because he had been working so hard on his Kansas farm that his health had given way and left him weak and nervous. So he left Aunt Em at home to watch after the hired men and to take care of the farm, while he traveled far away to Australia to visit his cousins and have a good rest.
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   Dorothy was eager to go with him on this journey, and Uncle Henry thought she would be good company and help cheer him up; so he decided to take her along. The little girl was quite an experienced traveler, for she had once been carried by a cyclone as far away from home as the marvelous Land of Oz, and she had met with a good many adventures in that strange country before she managed to get back to Kansas again. So she wasn't easily frightened, whatever happened, and when the wind began to howl and whistle, and the waves began to tumble and toss, our little girl didn't mind the uproar the least bit.
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   "Of course we'll have to stay in the cabin," she said to Uncle Henry and the other passengers, "and keep as quiet as possible until the storm is over. For the Captain says if we go on deck we may be blown overboard."
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   No one wanted to risk such an accident as that, you may be sure; so all the passengers stayed huddled up in the dark cabin, listening to the shrieking of the storm and the creaking of the masts and rigging and trying to keep from bumping into one another when the ship tipped sidewise.
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   Dorothy had almost fallen asleep when she was aroused with a start to find that Uncle Henry was missing. She couldn't imagine where he had gone, and as he was not very strong she began to worry about him, and to fear he might have been careless enough to go on deck. In that case he would be in great danger unless he instantly came down again.
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   The fact was that Uncle Henry had gone to lie down in his little sleeping-berth, but Dorothy did not know that. She only remembered that Aunt Em had cautioned her to take good care of her uncle, so at once she decided to go on deck and find him, in spite of the fact that the tempest was now worse than ever, and the ship was plunging in a really dreadful manner. Indeed, the little girl found it was as much as she could do to mount the stairs to the deck, and as soon as she got there the wind struck her so fiercely that it almost tore away the skirts of her dress.

ozma art-2 ozma art-1    

   Yet Dorothy felt a sort of joyous excitement in defying the storm, and while she held fast to the railing she peered around through the gloom and thought she saw the dim form of a man clinging to a mast not far away from her. This might be her uncle, so she called as loudly as she could: "Uncle Henry! Uncle Henry!"
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   But the wind screeched and howled so madly that she scarce heard her own voice, and the man certainly failed to hear her, for he did not move.
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   Dorothy decided she must go to him; so she made a dash forward, during a lull in the storm, to where a big square chicken-coop had been lashed to the deck with ropes. She reached this place in safety, but no sooner had she seized fast hold of the slats of the big box in which the chickens were kept than the wind, as if enraged because the little girl dared to resist its power, suddenly redoubled its fury.
With a scream like that of an angry giant it tore away the ropes that held the coop and lifted it high into the air, with Dorothy still clinging to the slats. Around and over it whirled, this way and that, and a few moments later the chicken-coop dropped faraway into the sea, where the big waves caught it and slid it up-hill to a foaming crest and then down-hill into a deep valley, as if it were nothing more than a plaything to keep them amused.
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   Dorothy had a good ducking, you may be sure, but she didn't lose her presence of mind even for a second. She kept tight hold of the stout slats and as soon as she could get the water out of her eyes she saw that the wind had ripped the cover from the coop, and the poor chickens were fluttering away in every direction, being blown by the wind until they looked like feather dusters without handles. The bottom of the coop was made of thick boards, so Dorothy found she was clinging to a sort of raft, with the sides of slats, which readily bore up her weight. After coughing the water out of her throat and getting her breath again, she managed to climb over the slats and stand upon the firm wooden bottom of the coop, which supported her easily enough.

  "You're in a pretty fix, Dorothy Gale, I can tell you!"

  "Why, I've got a ship of my own!" she thought, more amused than frightened at her sudden change of condition; and then, as the coop climbed up to the top of a big wave, she looked eagerly around for the ship from which she had been blown.

"I"t was far, far away, by this time. Perhaps no one on board had yet missed her, or knew of her strange adventure. Down into a valley between the waves the coop swept her, and when she climbed another crest the ship looked like a toy boat, it was such a long way off. Soon it had entirely disappeared in the gloom, and then Dorothy gave a sigh of regret at parting with Uncle Henry and began to wonder what was going to happen to her next.
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   Just now she was tossing on the bosom of a big ocean, with nothing to keep her afloat but a miserable wooden hen-coop that had a plank bottom and slatted sides, through which the water constantly splashed and wetted her through to the skin! And there was nothing to eat when she became hungry—as she was sure to do before long—and no fresh water to drink and no dry clothes to put on.
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   "Well, I declare!" she exclaimed, with a laugh. "You're in a pretty fix, Dorothy Gale, I can tell you! and I haven't the least idea how you're going to get out of it!"
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   As if to add to her troubles the night was now creeping on, and the gray clouds overhead changed to inky blackness. But the wind, as if satisfied at last with its mischievous pranks, stopped blowing this ocean and hurried away to another part of the world to blow something else; so that the waves, not being joggled any more, began to quiet down and behave themselves.
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   It was lucky for Dorothy, I think, that the storm subsided; otherwise, brave though she was, I fear she might have perished. Many children, in her place, would have wept and given way to despair; but because Dorothy had encountered so many adventures and come safely through them it did not occur to her at this time to be especially afraid. She was wet and uncomfortable, it is true; but, after sighing that one sigh I told you of, she managed to recall some of her customary cheerfulness and decided to patiently await whatever her fate might be.
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   By and by the black clouds rolled away and showed a blue sky overhead, with a silver moon shining sweetly in the middle of it and little stars winking merrily at Dorothy when she looked their way. The coop did not toss around any more, but rode the waves more gently—almost like a cradle rocking—so that the floor upon which Dorothy stood was no longer swept by water coming through the slats. Seeing this, and being quite exhausted by the excitement of the past few hours, the little girl decided that sleep would be the best thing to restore her strength and the easiest way in which she could pass the time. The floor was damp and she was herself wringing wet, but fortunately this was a warm climate and she did not feel at all cold.
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   So she sat down in a corner of the coop, leaned her back against the slats, nodded at the friendly stars before she closed her eyes, and was asleep in half a minute.

AFTERWARD: To the delight of Oz fans, Dorothy will find herself washed ashore in the land of Oz, reunited with her old friends the Tin Woodman, Scarecrow, and the Cowardly Lion. In trying to rescue the Queen of Ev from the evil Nome King, Dorothy and company will meet the Mechanical Man, the Hungry Tiger, a talking chicken, and a princess with 30 heads (one for each day of the month).
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HAVE YOU READ: Here, in the order in which Baum wrote them, are the Oz books that are still in print (available from a variety of publishers): The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; The Marvelous Land of Oz; Ozma of Oz; Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz; The Road to Oz; The Emerald City of Oz; The Patchwork Girl of Oz; The Little Wizard Series; and Tik-Tok of Oz.
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   Please note: After Baum's death, his wife contracted with several writers to continue the series. None of those sequels came close to matching the original wizard.
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   The entire text of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is available from Recorded Books (1-800-638-1304), as well as through your local library. Two video versions are also available: The Judy Garland musical, "The Wizard of Oz," and the all-black musical, "The Wiz."

Web UpdateFourteen days before the battle of Wounded Knee, an editorial appeared in the local press urging an assault on the Lakota tribe: "Their glory has fled, their spirit broken, their manhood effaced; better that they die than live the miserable wretches that they are." How many of the resulting 150 dead Indians could be attributed to that editorial is pure conjecture but a century later the writer's great-great grandson devoted his master's thesis to the subject of that editor's racist views. The editor? L. Frank Baum. Listen to NPR's "Oz Family Apologizes." Also: the Indian-Oz Connection.

 

Hey! Listen to This

Three author profiles appear at this site from
Jim Trelease's popular read-aloud anthologies,
Hey! Listen to This & Read All About It!
including the remarkable background stories
missing from the dust jackets of their books.

beverly clearyBeverly Cleary
author profile, by Jim Trelease
gary paulsen
Gary Paulsen
author profile, by Jim Trelease
wilson rawls
Wilson Rawls
author profile, by
Jim Trelease

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